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list price: $22.95
edition:Hardcover
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published: Apr 2017
ISBN:9781554518845
publisher: Annick Press

Eat Up

An Infographic Exploration of Food

by Paula Ayer & Antonia Banyard, illustrated by Belle Wuthrich

tagged: cooking & food, diet & nutrition, recycling & green living
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $22.95
edition:Hardcover
also available: Paperback
published: Apr 2017
ISBN:9781554518845
publisher: Annick Press
Description

Filled with fascinating facts delivered visually, this infographic book explores the topic of food from every aspect. Written for middle-grade readers, Eat Up! is a colorful infographic look at the many surprising and fascinating facts about food. Information is presented in easy-to-understand graphics and clear explanations. Each spread explores a different aspect of the topic. Readers will find answers to a wide range of questions, including: Who grows our food? Where does our meat and fish come from? How does it get to us? What’s the difference between a hybrid and a genetically-modified crop? How do companies advertize to children? Who are the “Big 10” food companies? How much farmland is there across the world? Weightier topics (for example, farming and pollution, or child labor in agriculture), are balanced out by fun facts, such as “extreme foods” and how our sense of taste works (and sometimes deceives us). Other topics include how food production has an impact on the local and global economy, access to food and food insecurity around the world, and conventional vs. organic farming. Vibrant, dynamic illustrations, diagrams and photos and small chunks of text make this book ideal for reluctant or struggling readers.

About the Authors

Paula Ayer

If you believe Paula AyerÕs parents, she was reading books by herself before she was three years old. She suspects they may be exaggerating, but she does remember spending much of her early years sitting on her favorite purple cushion next to the bookshelf, absorbed in stories of all sorts. By the time Paula was in fourth grade, she had read all the books in her elementary school library, so every week the librarian would walk her to the junior high school down the street, through crowds of intimidating teenagers, to borrow books from their library. Paula began her writing career several years later on her school newspaper, where her controversial horoscope column was the talk of the hallways. Other early writing accomplishments included a musical adaptation of Beowulf and a play about gerbils. After graduating, Paula defied expectations that she would pursue some kind of quiet, intellectual career by enrolling in the drama program at the University of Calgary. While she never fulfilled her dream of becoming a famous stage actor, her years in theater taught her the value of creative collaboration, along with helping her overcome her fear of making an idiot of herself in front of large groups of people. After receiving a Bachelor in Fine Arts, Paula moved to Vancouver and spent several years doing administrative work at a university. Sometimes her creative friends would ask her to write or edit things for their cool magazines and websites, and it eventually occurred to her that working with words might be something she could do. Without the nerve to actually try to be a professional writer, she went in the back way, taking a masterÕs degree in publishing at Simon Fraser University. She later worked as a freelancerÑediting cookbooks and academic works, writing reviews and interviews, and crafting promotional copy to sell overpriced DVD setsÑbefore joining the staff of Annick Press. At Annick she has been very lucky to work on a variety of books with talented illustrators, writers, and designers from across North America and the world. She has translated several childrenÕs books from French, edited and art-directed books, contributed to revised editions, helped come up with ideas for new books, and even posed for a last-minute book cover photo. PaulaÕs book Ready, Set, Kindergarten! (Spring 2015) was written while her daughter was preparing to start school and was inspired by the idea that children develop the skills they need for school through play and everyday activities. Her book Foodprints: The Story of What We Eat (Spring 2015) comes out of her longstanding interest in food and the implications of what we eat, and was written to help teens make sense of the crazily confusing information they hear about food. Paula lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with her husband, daughter, and an ever-growing collection of stuffed animals.
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Antonia Banyard is the author of a non-fiction book for children, Dangerous Crossings! and a novel for adults. She lives in Nelson, BC.
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Belle Wuthrich is an illustrator and designer specializing in books for young readers. Based in Vancouver, Belle has contributed to more than a dozen books for kids, a number of which have won awards or been republished internationally, including the Montaigne Medal Award–winning Eyes and Spies: How You’re Tracked and Why You Should Know and the Silver Birch Award nominee Eat Up: An Infographic Exploration of Food.
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Recommended Age and Grade
Age:
9 to 12
Grade:
4 to 7
Awards
  • , Red Cedar Book Award nomination
  • Commended, Green Book Festival Award
  • , Silver Birch Award nomination, Ontario Library Association
  • Joint winner, Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Editorial Reviews

“Inviting illustrations and an empowering amount of food-related data make this selection a fine choice for environmentally conscious tweens.”

— School Library Journal, 05/17

“Food is not just elemental; it is remarkable, and this effort does it justice.”

— Kirkus Reviews, 02/15/17

“Offers a wealth of thought-provoking information.” 

— Quill & Quire, 04/17

“While fun and engaging, this vibrant infographic doesn’t shy away from difficult issues.”

— Green Teacher, Spring/19