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Not Another Afghan Immigrant Story

Logo for the WIWF, a pair of glasses with 2021 in the lenses

Every September since 1997, the Winnipeg International Writers Festival presents THIN AIR, a celebration of books and ideas. Their curated line-up is a perfect fit for curious readers who are ready to discover strong voices and great storytelling in practically every genre. This year, they're presenting a hybrid festival featuring 60 writers, live events, and a dynamic website.

To watch video content Rahela Nayebzadah has prepared for them, visit the festival website.

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#FreeAfghanistan, #BlackLivesMatter, #EveryChildMatters, and #StopAsianHate are only some of the hashtags that have been taking over social media in the past year or so. And, only recently has there been an interest in BIPOC voices. What took so long? Don’t get me wrong—BIPOC voices are still underrepresented in literature and popular media. But, at least now, as a mother, I don’t have to worry about my children reading books written only by white authors.

When I wrote Monster Child, it was important that I not only appeal to the Afghan immigrant community, but to immigrants in gen …

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The Perplexities of the Human Condition

Every September since 1997, the Winnipeg International Writers Festival presents THIN AIR, a celebration of books and ideas. Their curated line-up is a perfect fit for curious readers who are ready to discover strong voices and great storytelling in practically every genre. This year, they're presenting a hybrid festival featuring 60 writers, live events, and a dynamic website.

To watch video content David Bergen has prepared for them, visit the festival website.

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Five writers, very different in their styles, but equal in their use of language to convey the perplexities of the human condition. I read each of these writers while working on Out of Mind, my latest novel. Not to imitate, but to understand structure, and how characters move, and what stuff these writers borrowed from the material world, and how contradiction and ingenuity raise the mundane, by giving it ‘its beautiful due.’

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