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list price: $13.99
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published: May 2021
pages: 24
ISBN:9781772602296
publisher: Second Story Press

The Doll

by Nhung N. Tran-Davies, illustrated by Ravy Puth

tagged: emigration & immigration
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
rated!
list price: $13.99
edition:eBook
also available: Hardcover
published: May 2021
pages: 24
ISBN:9781772602296
publisher: Second Story Press
Description

A young girl and her family arrive in an airport in a new country. They are refugees, migrants who have travelled across the world to find safety. Strangers greet them, and one of them gives the little girl a doll.

Decades later, that little girl is grown up and she has the chance to welcome a group of refugees who are newly arrived in her adopted country. To the youngest of them, a little girl, she gives a doll, knowing it will help make her feel welcome.

Inspired by real events.

About the Authors

Nhung N. Tran-Davies is a physician and advocate for social justice through education. Her family came to Canada as refugees from Vietnam in 1978. Nhung and her family live outside Edmonton, Alberta.

Author profile page >

Ravy Puth uses illustration to convey ideas of social action, convinced that art with a purpose is key to achieving impact and lasting significance. Born in Canada of Cambodian-Chinese parents, her work focuses on representations and cultural identities, that she explores through narratives of migration and feminism. She lives in Montreal, Quebec.

Author profile page >
Recommended Age and Grade
Age:
5 to 9
Grade:
2 to 4
Editorial Reviews

A touching, full-circle journey about the lasting impact of kindness.

— Kirkus Reviews

Good children’s literature serves as windows and mirrors. The Doll is exactly this kind of literature – children see themselves as well as others in the book.

— CM: Canadian Review of Materials

Nhung N. Tran-Davies tells her story in a gentle poetic text, using experiences as a child and matching them with the contemporary experiences of Syrian refugees.

— The Globe and Mail