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list price: $16.95
edition:Paperback
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published: Jun 2015
pages: 240
ISBN:9781927535820
publisher: Linda Leith Publishing

Canada Lives Here

The Case for Public Broadcasting

by Wade Rowland

tagged: media & communications industries, communication policy
0 of 5
0 ratings
rated!
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list price: $16.95
edition:Paperback
also available: eBook
published: Jun 2015
pages: 240
ISBN:9781927535820
publisher: Linda Leith Publishing
Description

Canada Lives Here tells the tumultuous story of public broadcasting in Canada, from its inception in 1933 to the CBC's current, controversial attempts to adapt to collapsing revenues and new technologies. It explores in detail the struggle to preserve public space and foster community in an environment devoted to profit-making, arguing that the ideals of public service broadcasting are more relevant now than ever. Rowland, author of the influential Saving the CBC: Balancing Profit and Public Service (2013), identifies the issues crucial to the CBC's survival and proposes carefully considered policy options. This is a book for everyone who wants to understand what's really at stake with the threatened eclipse of the nation's most important cultural institution.

Contributor Notes

Ranked among Canada's leading literary journalists, Wade Rowland is the author of more than a dozen non-fiction books including Ockham's Razor, Greed, Inc., and Saving the CBC. He spent many years in television news production at the network level and has held senior management roles at both CTV and CBC, where he was also senior producer of the consumer affairs program Marketplace. Rowland holds a Ph.D. in Communication and Culture and is currently Associate Professor at York University. Born in Montreal, he grew up in Regina and Winnipeg and currently lives in rural Port Hope, Ontario, with his wife.

Editorial Review

"This is an urgent, important and timely book about how public broadcasting in Canada is being eviscerated. The CBC has been abandoned, both by a government that should support it but won—t, and by a management culture, unable to handle the political, economic and technological headwinds affecting all media but especially public broadcasting. The CBC was once Canada's greatest cultural gift to the world, now in a perilous state of programming and financial decrepitude. But it's not yet lost. Wade Rowland gives us reasons for optimism, showing us how the CBC might yet be saved — if it can demonstrate that it can engage Canadians as citizens first, not just as deliverables to commercial and political interests." --Jeffrey Dvorkin. University of Toronto

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