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Most Anticipated: Our Fall 2021 Books for Young Readers Preview

It's September, and that means BACK TO THE BOOKS! Here are the books for young readers that will be delighting readers of all ages this fall.

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Picture Books

When the world gets too loud and chaotic, a young boy’s grandfather helps him listen with wonder instead in Thunder and the Noise Storms (October), by Jeffrey Ansloos & Shezza Ansloos, illustrated by Joshua Mangeshig Pawis-Steckley. Young train enthusiasts will delight in Listen Up! Train Song (August), by Victoria Allenby, exploring sound and language. Chaiwala! (October), by Priti Birla Maheshwari, illustrated by Ashley Barron, is a sensory celebration of family, food, and culture. A boy befriends a baby gargoyle in Anthony and the Gargoyl (October), a graphic-novel style wordless book from award-winning creators Jo Ellen Bogart and Maja Kastelic. Neighbours try to figure out why a child is walking a banana on a leash, while the child tries to make them understand that the banana is really a dog (named Banana!) in A Dog Named Banana (September), by Roxane Brouillard, illustrated by Giulia Sagramola. And the second in the Charlie's Rules series, following Pasture Bedtime, from bestselling author Sigmund Brouwer, Ruff Day (September) is sure to delight young animal lovers.

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Most Anticipated: Our Fall 2021 Nonfiction Preview

Our 2021 Fall Preview continues (have you seen our Most Anticipated Fiction yet?) with nonfiction, and exciting new books about everything, including food, beauty, art, travel, singing, healing, grieving, shopping, aging, and so much more.

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In Return (September), Kamal Al-Solaylee interviews dozens of people who have chosen to or long to return to their homelands, from the Basques to the Irish to the Taiwanese, and makes a return of sorts himself, to the Middle East, visiting Israel and the West Bank as well as Egypt to meet up with his sisters. Gone Viking II (November) features a series of remarkable excursions occurring over before, during, and after the voyages recounted in Bill Arnott's previous memoir, Gone Viking: A Travel Saga. The original French-language edition of Made-Up (September) was a cult hit in Quebec. Translated by Alex Manley—like author Daphne B., a Montreal poet and essayist—the book's English-language text crackles with life, retaining the flair and verve of the original, and ensuring that a book on beauty is no less beautiful than its subject matter.

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