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Apocalypses, Quests, and Survival

Angela Misri does it all, with her Portia Adams series about Sherlock Holmes' granddaughter and a fantastic middle grade series about cats and a raccoon surviving the zombie apocalypse (why not!). The latest book in the latter is Trip of the Dead, and it's out now.

Here, she shares some compelling companion reads that you can share with your favourite young avid reader.

**Enter here for a chance to win Trip of the Dead and three other middle grade novels as part of the DCB Middle Grade Bundle!**

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Surviving the City, by Tasha Spillett, illustrated by Natasha Donovan

I’m a nerd in every aspect of my life, including my bookshelf, so this graphic novel had me at the cover. This is a story of two friends and their abiding love for each other throughout their lives. It will resonate with anyone who has lost someone who gave them their sense of belonging.

I challenge you to decide which captures you more—Spillet’s finely chosen words or Donovan’s perfect visualizations of a city that doesn’t feel like home.

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Misfits, Marvelous Worlds and Magical Creatures in YA Fantasy

The Changeling of Fenlen Forest is the debut novel by Katherine Magyarody, the story of a girl who tracks her lost unicorn fawn into a strange land where people thing she is a changeling who too closely resembles a missing girl. Can Elizabeth find her fawn and solve the mystery of her doppelgänger? 

In this list, Magyarody shares other titles in which misfits find adventure. 

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Adventures don’t just happen to princesses and Chosen Ones…they also happen to lone wanderers and misfits at the edges of villages. These books take readers into gripping, taut stories where the heroes navigate strange worlds and tight-knit communities, often discovering strange animals along the way (and not just the human kind).   

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Book Cover The Dollmage

The Dollmage, by Martine Leavitt

The old Dollmage ("wise woman") of Seekvalley needs an heir. To protect her village, she watches over a set of dolls who must be carved and cared for and interpreted…but her power is weakening. Although she predicts the day her heir is born, she does not know if the destined child is Annakey or Renoa. The Do …

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Start Reading Arthur: The Dog Who Crossed a Jungle to Find a Home

We are delighted to present an excerpt from the new book, Arthur: The Dog Who Crossed the Jungle to Find a Home. The book, by adventure racer Mikael Lindnord, is the stunning true story of an unshakeable bond between a man and a dog. Arthur is already a bestseller in the UK and Sweden and Greystone Books has just published it in Canada. The excerpt is from Chapter 7, “Whatever it Takes,” and is set in South America, when Mikael must make a choice that will change his life forever.

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‘You can’t bring the dog.’

Even though it was dark, I could see that the race organizer was looking me hard in the eye as he said it. Though I’d known deep down for the last hour that he was going to say this, still as I looked back at him my mind was in turmoil.

Part of me wanted to scream: ‘He’s not ‘‘the dog’’, he’s Arthur. He needs me, I’m his only hope.’ Another part of me, looking around at the concerned expressions on everyone’s faces, knew that it was crazy, insane, mad, to be thinking about a stray dog when there was so much at stake for
us.

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Part of me wanted to scream: ‘He’s not ‘‘the dog’’, he’s Arthur. He needs me, I’m his only hope.’

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We were headed for at least fourteen hours of kayaking, often through difficult waters. Simo …

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Nisha Coleman and Busker: Stories from the Streets of Paris

Book Cover Busker Nisha Coleman

There are two reasons why right now is perfect time to be telling you about Nisha Coleman's Busker: Stories from the Streets of Paris. One is that we're focusing on oddballs and misfits this month here at 49th Shelf, in this misfit month with its 29 days, and Coleman encounters so many of these characters during her time busking in Paris living on the city's cultural fringes. And the second is that Valentines Day is on the horizon, and Coleman's memoir shows the City of Love like you've never seen it before. Busker is also very much a love story in its own right—just not the kind you're probably used to.  

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Kerry Clare: There are so many compelling bits of your memoir, and one of them for me is the way you write about loneliness of your life in Paris in the beginning, about your longing for just an ordinary friend. You meet so many characters in your daily life—the man with the moustache, the guy with the sex songs, Michel the kisser. Was there really such a dearth of ordinary folks? Are they just not approachable? Is normal too boring to write about? Is there such a thing as normal at all? 

Nisha Coleman: I don't believe in normal! I longed for an ordinary friend, but not a normal one. What I lacked in Paris was the kind of closeness that lets you relax i …

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Intrepid Travellers: Canadian Women in the World

This month at 49thShelf, we're Writing the World, exploring travel guides and memoirs, and books with global issues and international themes. And this week in particular, in the run-up to International Women's Day, we're celebrating women's stories, beginning with this cross-genre list—memoir, fiction, and poetry—of Canadian women's travel tales.

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Book Cover Outside of Ordinary

Outside of Ordinary: Women's Travel Stories, edited by Lynn Cecil and Catherine Bancroft

Thirty-two Canadian women writers—including Alison Pick, Sharon Butala, and Lorna Crozier—tell their travel stories in this anthology of stories in which lives are challenged spiritually, physically, emotionally, and otherwise, as well as deeply enriched. Elaine K. Miller cycles across the Southern United States, Janet Greidanus climbs to Everest Base Camp, and Jane Eaton Hamilton, on vacation in Mexico with her partner, contemplates whether to join the fight for same-sex marriage in Canada. For it seems that travel doesn't just change one's view of the world, but it changes also how one sees one's own self, and also notions of home. 

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