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The Minstrel Boy

by Sharon Stewart
edition: Paperback
  • age: 12 to 15
  • Grade: 7 to 10
tagged: historical, time travel, arthurian

Winner of the Canadian Children’s Book Centre Choice: Best Books for Kids & Teens
David Baird, a talented young rock musician, accompanies his estranged father to Wales. Fleeing after a quarrel, David has a bizarre motorcycle accident which hurls him back in time to medieval Prydein. A variation on the Arthurian legend, The Minstrel Boy introdu …

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Alexander Graham Bell

by A Roy Petrie
edition: Paperback
  • age: 10 to 13
  • Grade: 5 to 8
tagged: historical

Best known for the development of the telephone and the foundation of the Bell Telephone Company, Alexander Graham Bell was one of the last great inventors. His innovative genius in a variety of fields allowed Canada, his adopted country, to become a world leader in the swift technological expansion of the late nineteenth century.

Bell's father was …

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Crowfoot

by Carlotta Hacker
edition: Paperback
  • age: 10 to 13
  • Grade: 5 to 8
tagged: historical

When Crowfoot was born in 1830, the Blackfoot Confederacy was a powerful nation living free in the prairies. But as Crowfoot was growing up, earning a reputation for courage and wisdom, the Blackfoot way of life was disintegrating.

Traders brought disease and liquor;

The buffalo herds dwindled;

Government incentives encouraged settlers to flock to t …

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A Pocketful of Goobers

A Story about George Washington Carver

by Barbara Mitchell, illustrated by Peter E. Hanson
edition: Paperback
  • age: 9 to 14
  • Grade: 4 to 8
tagged: cultural heritage, science & technology, historical

There wasn't anything that George Washington Carver couldn't grow. He took the common goober--today's peanut--and created hundreds of useful products from it, turning goobers into a very profitable staple for the South. At the same time, this very special man passed on to everyone who knew him the importance of following one's own dreams.