amazon.ca

Thousands of Canadian-authored kids and YA books

Blog

On Our Radar: Art Books Spectacular

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Introducing Suzy Lake, by Sophie Hackett

"The artist regards us like an unbowed veteran of a long and difficult campaign." 

This career retrospective accompanies the exhibit on now at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Read more about the exhibit, also called "Introducing Suzy Lake," in Rupert Everett-Green's recent review in the Globe and Mail.

*****

Wilf Perrault: In the Alley by Dave Margoshes (Editor), Timothy Long and Donald Kerr

We were pleased to feature an excerpt from In the Alley on our blog earlier this month, a book that commemorates the Wilf Perrault exhibit on at the Mackenzie Art Gallery in Regina until January 4.

"I was never a cutting edge artist," Donald Kerr quotes Perreault as saying. "All I want to be is true to me. I’ll be a cutting edge artist someday."

*****

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Not the First Thing I've Missed, by Fionncara MacEoin

Reviewed by Emily Davidson at ARC Poetry Magazine

"Not the First Thing I’ve Missed, Saskatoon poet Fionncara MacEoin’s debut collection, anthologizes the break and swell of the everyday. The book indexes shortcomings, poverty, addiction, the transience of home, and the promising breadth of nature. Despite the book’s title, it is hard to imagine, with her spare, merciless, fearless verse, that MacEoin misses much of anything at all."

*****

Will Starling, by Ian Weir

Reviewed by Steven Brown in the Vancouver Sun:

"So what exactly is the story about? That would be telling. It’s a rollicking good yarn with many twists and turns. It’s a mystery solved. It’s moonlit graveyards and surgeon’s tables, primitive instruments and strange experiments. It’s dastardly doings too ’orrible to …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

tagged: on our radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Interference, by Michelle Berry

From Julianne Isaacs' review at The Winnipeg Review

"My friend, this is the book for you. Ominous as its themes may be, Interference is tightly plotted and neatly executed, very nearly perfectly paced, and satisfyingly complex—but it is also escapism in its purest form, and a sheer delight to read.

The inhabitants of Parkville’s Edgewood Drive are normal, familiar. Ralph and Claire are coping with the demands of chemotherapy on Claire’s cancer-stricken body; their teenage children are attempting to cope. Tom and Maria are occupied with worry over their obsessive-compulsive daughter, Becky, and ignoring the problems in their marriage. Across the street, Trish, a busy mother and small-business owner, cleans up after her kids and screens all her calls when she’s finally alone in the house. Next door to Trish lives Dayton, fresh off the plane from California with a new baby—and no sign of a husband. A few streets away live peripheral characters—Michael, a disfigured car-wash employee, and Leah, the mother of a disable …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun? by Doretta Lau

From Mark Sampson's review at Free Range Reading

"While the marketing bumpf promises a 'whimsical new take on what it means to be Canadian,' what we actually get is a wild, smash-mouth array of wholly original pieces, a deliberate hodgepodge that puts us an entire galaxy away from the staid 'immigrant-as-nationalism' narrative that is so overdone in our country’s literature. Lau’s pieces run the gamut from the violent and vulgar to the tender and touching. Yes, most of her characters are Asian Canadians struggling to find their way in the world, but each tale stands on its own as a singular thing, carefully wrought with an eye toward pristine originality."

*****

Yaw, by Dani Couture

From Maisonneuve's "Two Poets Discuss" feature

"YAW, as a title, isn’t just appropriate because …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Artificial Cherry, by Billeh Nickerson

From Kimmy Beach's review at Canadian Poetries: 

"This is a gleeful, fun book, right up my popcult alley, and stuffed with seedy fake Elvises, bad cocktail parties, sad rooms in luxury hotels, Colonel Sanders, and the Loch Ness Monster. The poems are sweet, funny, sorrowful at times, sexy at others. They tug at our hearts without being maudlin, and he occasionally milks a great cheap joke to the full extent of his power."

From Haiku Night in Canada:

Gordie Fucking Howe
Mario Fucking Lemieux
Wayne Fucking Gretzky

*****

Base Camp: 40 Days on Everest, by Dianne Whelan

From Dianne Whelan's interview at Canadian Geographic:

"The ambition at base camp is raw and extreme. It’s a hard place. When I went there the first time, all I could see was the ego and selfishness, the ambition gone wrong. But you have a lot of tim …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar: Morissette, Nakamura, Shin, Freedman, and Burrows

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

New Tab by Guillaume Morissette 

From Vicki Ziegler's review at Bookgaga:

"Morissette’s quietly witty novel is set in up to the moment Montreal and traces a year in the life of 27-year-old Thomas, a disaffected video game designer looking languidly and yearningly, but not without an undercurrent of genuine determination, to change career and personal directions. Against a blurred-around-the-edges backdrop of dodgy accommodations, fleeting and vague relationships, substance over-consumption (it’d be harsh to call it abuse because it seems so tinged with a kind of innocence), Thomas makes his way. The reader peeks over Thomas’ shoulder at email and Facebook chat clues as to how he progresses, professionally and emotionally."

*****

Peach Girl by Raymond Nakamura and Rebecca Bender

From Charis Cotter's review at the National Reading Campaign:

"Nak …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

tagged: on our radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

I Was There the Night He Died by Ray Robertson

From David Worsley's review in Cord Community: "I Was There The Night He Died doesn’t read like a lot of Canadian fiction. It’s urban, has a lot of alt-country and obscure rock and roll in it, and it’s not trying to turn anyone into a better human being. It’s just a great story populated by some very real, very flawed characters.

Granted, no one who works for the Chatham Chamber of Commerce will be too thrilled, but I think many of the rest of us will remember fondly a life not too far removed from our own, and have a laugh on the way."

****

Grayling by Gillian Wigmore

From Caroline Woodward's review in BC Booklook: "Grayling is a page-turner that wears its dense layers lightly. Wigmore’s pitch-perfect language and brilliantly-paced unspooling of the plot (think fishing line, dancing here and …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Book Cover Strange Gift

The Strange Gift of Gwendolyn Golden by Philippa Dowding

From Danielle's review at Bookish Notions: "Gwendolyn Golden isn’t your average tweenager. Ever since her dad mysteriously vanished during a storm, she finds herself yelling, unable to stop. Now, as if she needed something else to set her apart from the other kids at school, she wakes up with the ability to fly, er, float. The Strange Gift of Gwendolyn Golden by Philippa Dowding tells the story of how Gwendolyn deals with her curious new ability and how it turns her world upside down (both literally and figuratively).

With one of the best opening scenes I’ve read in a long time, Gwendolyn Golden is an absolutely charming read from page one. I was instantly curious about this girl who wakes up on her bedroom ceiling, and I am not ashamed to admit that it had me giggling on more than one occasion."

 

*****

Book Cover Wood

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Dear Leaves, I Miss You All by Sara Heinonen 

From Mark Sampson's review at "Free Range Reading": "So it’s nice to read a collection like Sara Heinonen’s Dear Leaves, I Miss You All, which shatters that simple schism and shows us a third way (and a fourth, and a fifth) to hold a book of stories together. That’s not to say there aren’t reoccurring characters in Dear Leaves. There are: they take the form of the delightfully dysfunctional but no less loving couple Barb and Benny, who gently (and humorously) battle one another for dominance in their marriage across several of these tales. But there is a larger emotional arc at work in Dear Leaves, a journey that Heinonen is taking us on to explore one of the chief preoccupations of our post-modern age… That preoccupation, of course, is anxiety.

If this all sounds heady, rest assured that Dear Leaves is also quite light on its feet, and deeply, deeply funny in places. In fact, I don’t recall the last time a short story collection won the Stephen Leacock Medal, but here’s hoping Heinonen’s publishe …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Sanaaq by Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk

From Keavy Martin's review in The Globe & Mail: "It may be understandable, then, that southerners exhibit a tendency to read Sanaaq (in French and now English) primarily for its ethnographic qualities—that is, for its ability to provide authentic access to the realities of Inuit life. Yet at certain moments, the novel also seems to resist this kind of transparency, as it makes use of both language and plot twists that may baffle its new English-speaking audience. For instance, the ease with which Sanaaq’s cousin Aqiarulaaq is able to persuade her relative Ningiukuluk to give up her middle daughter may surprise readers unfamiliar with Inuit adoption practices, while the episode in which the young Maatiusi—heartbroken after his fiancée conceives a child by the chief factor at the trading post—becomes dangerously entangled with a nuliarsaq, or invisible wife, might also leave southern readers scratching their heads. Yet rather than attempting to draw large (and largely inaccurate) conclusions about Inuit culture, southern …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar: Rideout, Petrou, Marston, Heiti, and Hughes

"On Our Radar" is a new monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books in all genres with buzz worth sharing. The buzz hails from around the Internet, and beyond ...

*****

Book Cover Arguments With the Lake

Arguments With the Lake by Tanis Rideout 

From Mark Sampson at Free Range Reading:

"The listless, monolithic hulk of Lake Ontario looms large in this stellar collection of interconnected poems by Tanis Rideout. Arguments with the Lake takes as its basis the lives of two teenage swimmers from the 1950s, Marilyn Bell and Shirley Campbell, the former of which was the first person ever to swim across Lake Ontario. By plunging into the aquatic depths of these two characters’ fictionalized emotional lives, Rideout pulls off a poetic rendering of two historical figures that is as consuming as it is invigorating."

Read the whole review here

*****

Is This Your First War? by Michael Petrou

Winner of the 2013 Ottawa Book Award for English Non-Fiction. From the jury statement:

"Is This Your First War? is a harrowing journey into the heart of darkness of post-9/11 Afghanistan. In this journalistic coming …

Continue reading »

On Our Radar

"On Our Radar" is a new monthly 49th Shelf series featuring books with buzz worth sharing. We bring you links to features and reviews about great new books in a multitude of genres from all around the Internet.

*****

Book Cover The Best Thing About Kindergarten

The Best Thing About Kindergarten by Jennifer Lloyd, Illustrated by Qin Leng

From the blog Perogies & Gyoza:

"I'm sure there are some kindy kids who are apprehensive about their new journey, and for them I would recommend this book about the joys of kindergarten... It might seem odd to recommend a book about finishing kindergarten to kids who are just starting—but all kids of this age can identify with the excitement of the classroom and the love of a good teacher." 

Read the whole review here

*****

Accusation by Catherine Bush

From the Now Toronto review by Susan G. Cole: 

"You can record, videotape, photograph and do a ton of other things to document a situation. But you can never be sure whether you’ve discovered any actual truths. That’s the theme of Catherine Bush’s deftly rendered tale about a seasoned journalist trying to get to …

Continue reading »